Cards of Wine

Saint-Emilion (France)

Saint-Emilion is a wine from from Bordeaux's Right Bank.

It is a blend of Merlot and Cabernet Franc.

Typical Flavors


Raspberry
Raspberry
Black Cherry
Black
Cherry
Plum
Plum
Blackberry
Blackberry

Blueberry
Blueberry
Violets
Violets
Herbs
Herbs
Pepper
Pepper

Oak added Flavors:

Vanilla
Vanilla
Coffee
Coffee
Chocolate
Chocolate
Tobacco
Tobacco

Raspberry, Black Cherry, Plum, Tobacco and Vanilla are typical Saint Emilion flavors.

Profile

Saint Emilion is a medium wine with medium tannins and acidity:

BODYMedium - Plus
TANNINSMedium
FRUITMedium
ACIDITYMedium - Plus
Serving temperature:
14-15°C (57-59°F)
Oaked 16-18°C (61-64°F)

Food Pairing


Antipasti
Finger Food
Pizza
Pizza
Hamburger
Hamburger
Ham
Ham

Soup
Casseroles
Pasta
Pasta
Mushroom
Mushroom
Chicken
Chicken

Rabbit
Rabbit
Pork
Pork
Lamb
Lamb
Veal
Veal

Saint Emilion goes well with a wide variety of food.

Sipped alone is a wonderful meditation wine.

Pairing Suggestions

Excellent Pairing:
French Cuisine. Italian Dishes (Tomato Based).
Pizza. Baked Pasta. Lasagna.
Spaghetti Meatballs. Hamburger.
Fried or Grilled Mushrooms.
Casseroles. Beef Stew.
Veal Chops. Wiener Schnitzel.
Meatloaf. Beef Wellington.
BBQ. Chicken. Pork. Rabbit.
Roasted Lamb. Lamb Chops. Lamb Shank.
Red Meat Dishes.

Cheese:
Aged Cheese. Cheddar. Gouda. Pecorino.

If You Like Saint Emilion

You Might Also Like:

Barbera Superiore (Italy)
Bordeaux Right Bank (France)
Rosso di Montalcino (Italy)
Cannonau (Italy)
Châteauneuf-du-Pape (France)
Chianti Classico (Italy)
Merlot (France)
Montepulciano d'Abruzzo (Italy)
Primitivo (Italy)
Ribeira Sacra (Spain)
Vino Nobile di Montepulciano (Italy)
Zinfandel (USA)

The Ideal Glass

The Bordeaux glass is perfect for a bodied red wine.

It is taller than other red wine glasses, and has a slimmer bowl.

The large size of the glass allows the bouquet to develop. It smooths out rough edges, plays down tannins, and allows the wines to achieve balance.

The slimmer bowl sends the wine directly to the back of the mouth for maximum taste.

About Saint-Emilion

Saint-Emilion is the oldest wine area of the Bordeaux region.

The region is on the UNESCO World Heritage List (1999).

The official Saint-Emilion classification was conducted in 1955.

It was updated in 1969, 1986, 1996, (2006*), and 2012.

* 2006 was declared invalid. 1996 was used instead.

The 2012 classification defines:

Premiers Grands Crus Classés A

The highest classification of Sain-Emillon.

Château Angélus
Château Ausone
Château Cheval Blanc
Château Pavie

Premiers Grands Crus Classés B

Château Beauséjour
Château Beau-Sejour Becot
Château Belair-Monange
Château Canon
Château Canon La Gaffelière
Château Figeac
Château La Gaffelière
Château Pavie Macquin
Château Troplong-Mondot
Château Trottevieille
Château Larcis-Ducasse
Château Valandraud
Clos Fourtet
Château La Mondotte

Grands Crus Classés

Château l'Arrosée
Château Balestard-La-Tonnelle
Château Barde-Haut
Château Bellefont-Belcier
Château Bellevue
Château Bergat
Château Berliquet
Château Cadet-Bon
Château Cadet Piola
Château Cap de Mourlin
Château Chauvin
Château Clos de Sarpe
Château Corbin
Château Côte de Baleau
Château Dassault
Château Destieux
Château Faugères
Château Faurie de Souchard
Château de Ferrand
Château Fleur-Cardinale
Château Fombrauge
Château Fonplégade
Château Fonroque
Château Franc-Mayne
Château Grand-Mayne
Château Grand-Pontet
Château Les Grandes Murailles
Château Guadet
Château Grand Corbin
Château Corbin-Despagne
Château Haute Sarpe
Château Jean Faure
Château La Clotte
Château La Clusiere
Château La Commanderie
Château La Couspaude
Château La Dominique
Château La Fleur Morange
Château La Marzelle
Château La Serre
Château La Tour-Figeac
Château Le Chatelet
Château Le Prieure
Château Laniote
Château Larmande
Château Laroque
Château Laroze
Château Matras
Château Moulin du Cadet
Château Pavie Decesse
Château Peby Faugeres
Château Petit Faurie de Soutard
Château de Pressac
Château Quinault l'Enclos
Château Ripeau
Château Rochebelle
Château Saint-Georges Cote Pavie
Château Sansonnet
Château Soutard
Château Tertre Daugay
Château Villemaurine
Château Yon Figeac
Clos des Jacobins
Clos de l'Oratoire
Clos La Madeleine
Clos Saint-Martin
Convent des Jacobins

Over 200 other Saint-Émilion wines carry the description "Grand Cru". These are awarded under the basic appellation rules and are not part of the formal Saint-Emmilion 1955 classification.

Standard Grand Cru wines are not seen as being of comparable quality to the Grand Cru Classe wines listed above.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux in Southwest France is the most famous wine region in the world.

France

The river Gironde splits the area in the famous Left Bank (Southwest) and the Right Bank (Northeast) where the two famous, but very different, Bordeaux Blends are produced.

The Left Bank

On the Left Bank, Cabernet Sauvignon is the primary grape.

A typical top-quality "Bordeaux Blend" consists of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 15% Cabernet Franc, and 15% Merlot.

Left Bank wines are often spicy with bold tannins and are good candidates for aging.

The Right Bank

On the Right Bank, Merlot is the primary grape.

A typical Right Bank blend consists of 70% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Franc, and 15% Cabernet Sauvignon.

Right Bank wines are also bold, but smoother, with softer tannins and typical Merlot fruity flavors. They can age, but are more "drink me soon" style.

Bordeaux is dominated by red wine. Nearly 90% of all Bordeaux wine is red.

The most planted grape is Merlot, followed by Cabernet Sauvignon.

Red Grapes

66% Merlot
23% Cabernet Sauvignon
10% Cabernet Franc
  2% Malbec
  1% Petit Verdot

White Grapes

47% Sémillon
45% Sauvignon Blanc
  5% Muscadelle


Bordeaux Left Bank

On the Left Bank, Cabernet Sauvignon is the primary grape.

A typical top-quality "Bordeaux Blend" consists of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 15% Cabernet Franc, and 15% Merlot.

Left Bank wines are often spicy with bold tannins and are good candidates for aging.

The terroir is rocky, with gravel (stones) and some limestone.

In the wine world, this bad soil means good wine because the more the roots have to struggle, the better the quality. Rocky soils and hillsides give a good drainage (too much water gives a watery berry).

Famous appellations are:

  • Haut-Médoc
  • Margaux (Château Margaux)
  • St.Estephe
  • St.Julien
  • Pauillac (Château Lafite-Rothschild, Château Mouton Rothschild and Château Latour)
  • Pessac Leognan (Château Haut-Brion)
Few chateaux with many hectars (50-80ha average).

Flavors:

Young: Spices. Earth. Tobacco.

Aged: Leather. Smoke. Truffle. Herbs. Cigar box.

Bordeaux Right Bank

On the Right Bank, Merlot is the primary grape.

A typical Right Bank blend consists of 70% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Franc, and 15% Cabernet Sauvignon.

Right Bank wines are also bold, but smoother, with softer tannins and typical Merlot fruity flavors. They can age, but are more "drink me soon" style.

The terroir on the right bank is less difficult, with less gravel and more clay and limestone.

Famous appellations are:

  • St. Emilion (Cheval Blanc)
  • Pomerol (Petrus)
Many small chateaux with few hectars (30 average).

Flavors:

Young: Black Cherry. Red Plum. Flowers. Chocolate. Licorice.

Aged: Earth. Truffle. Dark Chocolate. Tobacco.

White Bordeaux

White Bordeaux uses Sauvignon Blanc and Semillion as primary grapes.

Alcohol can be addictive. Drink in moderation.

Cards of Wine is an independent web site. Help us to be better.

Contact: cardsofwine@gmail.com